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Books & Reviews

Archive | Books & Reviews

Jeffrey Sachs and The Price of Civilization

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Random House Trade Paperbacks

Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, was named among the 100 most influential leaders in the world by Time Magazine in 2004 and 2005. Sachs, the Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University, is also Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. From 2002 to 2006, he was Director of the UN Millennium Project and Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan on the Millennium Development Goals, the internationally agreed goals to reduce extreme poverty, disease, and hunger by 2015.

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Panel Discussion: Reimagining Japan: The Quest for a Future That Works

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VIZ Media LLC

Re-Imagining Japan: the Quest for a Future that Works, a panel discussion on the future of post-quake Japan with panelists, Gerald Curtis, Christopher Graves and David Sanger and moderator, Rik Kirkland, convened at Japan Society on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011. The speakers sought to address the state of affairs in Tohoku, Japan, and in particular to make recommendations for Japan’s future. They commented on John Dower’s description of the “myth of change resistant Japan” and recommended that now is the time for bold drastic political, economic and social change, especially at the local level so that those who are really in the middle of the crisis like the mayors of Tohoku can move quickly and effectively. In so doing, perhaps an effort towards radical entrepreneurship could take place.

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Three Handbooks for Election 2012

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Shealah Craighead/SarahPAC
Shealah Craighead/SarahPAC

Shealah Craighead/SarahPAC

Some American political consultants say that elections are simple addition problems, combining identified Democratic and Republican voters for victory. Others claim they concern broader American values, which either party can exploit at any occasion. The following three books analyze momentary political labels and long-term U.S. cultural trends. They are far denser and richer than Facebook and Twitter political dialogue, and ultimately more satisfying for the U.S. citizen searching beyond weekly journalism for a philosophical understanding of the 2012 presidential elections. Much of the snarl in political debate comes from a single-minded fixation on proximate cause. The most perceptive political histories can provide a measure of solace as well as wisdom for breathless activists.

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