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Editor's Picks

The Best of April

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A few of our favorite stories from April.

A few of our best of April articles

A few of our best of April articles

In this list we’ve included an analysis of President Barack Obama’s hesitation to use military intervention in places like Syria and Ukraine by Peter Lee. A piece by Gary Sands titled, “Dragon v. Godzilla: How Far will the U.S. go to Reassure Japan?,” which looks at how far the United States is willing to go to reassure Japan in the face of heightened tensions in the Asia-Pacific region. Nicole Wenstrup’s review of Robert Oprisko’s Honor: A Phenomenology, which examines how society’s are structured. Ramzy Baroud’s “The Moral Crisis at the Heart of Obama’s Mid-East Peace Effort,” which looks at the failure to reach a Middle East peace agreement and how one man, Martin Indyk, can be faulted more than any other Obama administration official, and Himanil Raina’s “Clausewitzian Perspectives on Russia’s Actions in Ukraine,” which is an analysis of the crisis in Ukraine by examining it through the eyes of the 19th century tactician and military general, Carl von Clausewitz.

We’ve also included for your consideration, a piece that examines the tainted legacy of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad by Iranian journalist Kourosh Ziabari titled, “Ahmadinejad is Gone, and so is Ahmadinejadism!” Three pieces by Binoy Kampmark, “Deceptive Gyrations: Rebasing the Growth of the Nigerian Economy,” “The Poverty Incentive: Making the Poor Carry the Refugee Can” and “Whaling Contradictions: Japan, Australia and the International Court of Justice.” Also included is a piece on Afghanistan’s historic presidential election by Afghan writer Fahim Masoud titled, “Afghanistan’s Day of Truth.” Finally, we’ve added a piece by Patrick Hall and John Lyman, “Has Putin Overplayed his Hand in Ukraine?,” which examines whether Vladimir Putin has crossed a bridge too far and lacks a long term strategy.

Be sure to share any of the article’s with your friends on Facebook and Twitter and leave a comment, we’ve made it quite easy to do so.

Following heavy fighting in the Yarmouk refugee camp in Damascus, Palestinian refugees line up to receive food aid from UN workers. Photo: ONU Brasil

Following heavy fighting in the Yarmouk refugee camp in Damascus, Palestinian refugees line up to receive food aid from UN workers. Photo: ONU Brasil

Armenian Insecurity and the #SaveKessab Campaign
By Shahed Ghoreishi

The our 24 hours news cycle has the attention span of a gnat. So with great sadness it took Kim Kardashian and her #SaveKessab campaign to remind us of carnage of the Syrian civil war.

Afghan women register to vote during a meeting in the Tarnek Wa Jaldek district in Zabul province, Afghanistan, Sept. 18, 2013

Afghan women register to vote during a meeting in the Tarnek Wa Jaldek district in Zabul province, Afghanistan, Sept. 18, 2013

Afghanistan’s Day of Truth
By Fahim Masoud

Afghanistan’s historic presidential election ushers in a new era of hope as millions of Afghans turn out to vote including the author’s mother in Herat, in western Afghanistan.

Anti-whaling activists from Sea Shepherd confront a Japanese whaling ship. Photo: Adam Lau

Anti-whaling activists from Sea Shepherd confront a Japanese whaling ship. Photo: Adam Lau

Whaling Contradictions: Japan, Australia and the International Court of Justice
By Binoy Kampmark

It has been a long and drawn out affair. For years, Australian environmental activists and political figures have had the Japanese whaling program in their sights.

Alexander Mozhaev, a pro-Russian separatist whose photograph has appeared in numerous publications insists that he is not employed by the Russian state. Photo: Maxim Dondyuk

Alexander Mozhaev, a pro-Russian separatist whose photograph has appeared in numerous publications insists that he is not employed by the Russian state. Photo: Maxim Dondyuk

Has Putin Overplayed his Hand in Ukraine?
By John Lyman and Patrick Hall

Until recently, Vladimir Putin has had to contend with little more than targeted sanctions for violating the territorial integrity of Ukraine.

Asylum seekers in Australia. Photo: Sharon Tisdale

Asylum seekers in Australia. Photo: Sharon Tisdale

The Poverty Incentive: Making the Poor Carry the Refugee Can
By Binoy Kampmark

Much like undocumented immigrants, asylum seekers make policymakers uneasy. And in Australia, asylum seekers are caught in a particularly precarious legal position.

Secretary of State John Kerry appearing before the Senate Foreign Relations committee

Secretary of State John Kerry appearing before the Senate Foreign Relations committee

How the Middle East Peace Process went ‘Poof’
By Uri Avnery

Secretary of State John Kerry has all but admitted that the Middle East peace process is dead. Much like most of the Obama administration’s initiatives in the region it has gone nowhere.

Infantrymen curiously eye the new British Army weapon – a Mark I ‘tank’ – before its debut in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on 15 September 1916. Photo: IWM-Q 5574

Infantrymen curiously eye the new British Army weapon – a Mark I ‘tank’ – before its debut in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on 15 September 1916. Photo: IWM-Q 5574

Tanks in Cyberspace
By Thomas C. Wingfield and Robert Sharp

What are the similarities between tanks and cyberspace? What lessons can be identified and learned?

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel touring a military academy in Beijing

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel touring a military academy in Beijing

Gunboat Diplomacy in South China Sea Can Lead to a Red Line
By John Price

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel making his fourth trip to the South China Sea region recently, wanted to reassure Japan and other nations that the U.S. stands with them if China pursues stated territorial annexation.

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim at the 2012 World Bank Annual Meeting. Photo: Ryan Rayburn

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim at the 2012 World Bank Annual Meeting. Photo: Ryan Rayburn

Deceptive Gyrations: Rebasing the Growth of the Nigerian Economy
By Binoy Kampmark

Nigeria is now Africa’s largest economy. This hardly seemed to make sense, given that South Africa, with a GDP of $354 billion in 2013, was streets ahead.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran’s former president, speaking at the Natanz nuclear facility

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran’s former president, speaking at the Natanz nuclear facility

Ahmadinejad is Gone, and so is Ahmadinejadism!
By Kourosh Ziabari

Kourosh Ziabari looks at the legacy of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. He’s been out of office for a little under a year but his legacy still affects Iran and Iranians.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Norgler/Wikimedia

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Norgler/Wikimedia

Clausewitzian Perspectives on Russia’s Actions in Ukraine
By Himanil Raina

Are the musings of Carl von Clausewitz, a 19th century general, relevant to a 21th century crisis? Great works are defined by their characteristic of capturing unchanging human experiences.

Martin Indyk, U.S. Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations

Martin Indyk, U.S. Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations

The Moral Crisis at the Heart of Obama’s Mid-East Peace Effort
By Ramzy Baroud

Martin Indyk is most likely the one individual that encapsulates perfectly the failed drive to revive the Middle East peace process.

‘Honor: A Phenomenology’ by Robert L. Oprisko. 210 pp. Routledge

‘Honor: A Phenomenology’ by Robert L. Oprisko. 210 pp. Routledge

A Review of Robert Oprisko’s Honor: A Phenomenology
By Nicole Wenstrup

Robert Oprisko’s book, Honor: A Phenomenology, while published in 2012, offers a fresh new look on how society is structured (from the individual to the international) through the practice of honor.

President Barack Obama speaking in Japan. Junko Kimura-Matsumoto/Bloomberg

President Barack Obama speaking in Japan. Junko Kimura-Matsumoto/Bloomberg

Dragon v. Godzilla: How Far will the U.S. go to Reassure Japan?
By Gary Sands

As Obama visits Japan and South Korea this week tensions in the Asia-Pacific region have never been greater. The overriding question is how far does the U.S. commitment to Japan’s security go?

President Barack Obama making remarks at the White House in Washington, D.C., July 12, 2011

President Barack Obama making remarks at the White House in Washington, D.C., July 12, 2011

Interventionists’ Attack Obama’s Foreign Policy Restraint
By Peter Lee

Obama’s efforts to push-back against neoliberal and neocon interventionists is perhaps the one bright spot in the grisly parade of foreign policy cockups that is Obama’s foreign policy.

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