In the Midst of Plenty: America’s Struggling Political Economy

September 12, 2012 by

“Deficits don’t matter” was the refrain from the previous three Republican administrations justifying their unwillingness to adhere to their fiscally conservative campaign platform and doling out corporate welfare to any company aligned with their interests. It was utilized as a means to defend the nation’s ballooning deficit: depicting it as a temporary consequence to ensure the countries domestic economic stability.

Death in Benghazi: The Dark Side of the Citizens’ Revolt in Libya

September 12, 2012 by

The American delegation in Benghazi has been left reeling by the deaths of four of its staff, amongst them Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens. The deaths occurred in an effort to evacuate the consulate, which came under attack from a heavily armed mob. History is tinged with irony. It was only last year that President Barack Obama, along with then French President Nicolas Sarkozy, saw Benghazi as a place of promise against a vengeful Gaddafi regime.

Russia’s New ICBM: An Arms Race Cloaked by a Bear’s Diplomacy

September 12, 2012 by

Russia’s recent announcement that it is building a next-generation Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) is squarely designed to address the perceived threats from the US and NATO to build a missile defense system in Europe. While the justification for this new ICBM exudes platitudes of a defensive posturing, the Russian reality is that a new ICBM is the logical next step in its modernization strategy under President Vladimir Putin.