The Fallacy of Choosing Favorites in Afghanistan

July 10, 2012 by

Michael O’Hanlon of the Brookings Institution has written a piece in the Washington Post “Picking a Winner in Afghanistan” that argues that whoever replaces Karzai in 2014 will prove to be as important in holding the country together as whether a return of the Taliban and Al Qaeda can be prevented. O’Hanlon takes the position that the United States should in essence help facilitate selection of the next Afghan president once Karzai’s second term ends, and do whatever it can to encourage the election of a reformer.

Time to Talk Camp David: Will New Egypt Meet Old Expectations?

July 10, 2012 by

Despite early assurances by Egypt’s new President Mohammed Morsi regarding his “commitment to international treaties and agreements,” one can already foretell a likely confrontation between Egypt and Israel. A chaotic transition notwithstanding, a new, post-revolution Egypt is emerging. It is is more self-assertive, emphasizing issues of national dignity and respect. In fact, the word ‘Karama’ - dignity in Arabic - is now paramount in the budding discourse.

Faulting the Guardians: Failing Financial Regulators

July 10, 2012 by

Guardians can be such insipid creatures. Their skills often lie in excusing their indiscretions and ignorance rather than performing their true functions – guarding against set improprieties and wrongs. With the Barclays crisis over the Libor rate, financial regulators are being pushed into the limelight they would rather avoid. London and Washington are proving to be the sites of intense activity, with an interest being taken to pursue 10 big banking names including Citigroup, UBS, JP Morgan.

The ECB is Quickly Running out of Options

July 10, 2012 by

When policymakers are lacking in credibility and competence, confidence in their ability to govern is likely to be in short supply. This is particularly notable in reference to the Eurozone and its steadily deteriorating economy – most acutely felt by the ’sin states’ of the Mediterranean. With Europe’s leaders now finally in admission of the debt fuelled malaises, the emphasis has turned to crisis and resolution management, and the markets are feeling uneasy.