Somalia: The International Community can’t Afford to Get it Wrong

February 28, 2012 by

In a February article published on International Policy Digest (IPD), Somalia’s Special Envoy to United States, Abukar Arman, wrote, “Since the collapse of the military government 21 years ago, Somalia went through various levels of problems perpetuated by clan militias, warlords, economic-lords, religious-lords, regional-lords, and a group that I would refer to as the Ghost-lords.” In Arman’s analysis, the Ghost-lords are meant to denote “a loose association of paradoxical powers of the Good, Bad, and Ugly of the International Community”.

Post-Fukushima Japan’s Energy Market

February 28, 2012 by

In a few weeks it will be the one year anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster, which had all but soured the Japanese public’s appetite for nuclear energy. What once supplied 25% of the country’s energy needs, nuclear power plants are being decommissioned one by one. As of February 2011, only two of the country’s 54 commercial reactors remained functioning. While the disaster was a year ago, the Japanese economy is still feeling the after effects. Last month, Japan hit a record trade deficit at $18.59 billion, topping its previous record during the Asian financial crisis of the 1990’s.

The Enigma of the London Conference on Somalia

February 28, 2012 by

If there is any consensus on the nature and the outcome of the London Conference on Somalia - that brought together representatives of over 50 nations, including a number of Muslim nations, it must be the fact that it was a puzzling event that raised much speculation. Now that the fanfare has ended, it is time for an objective appraisal. However, I must confess it would not be easy to remain steadfast in that quest when most—nations, groups, and individuals—already espoused one preconceived notion or another. Skepticism was fueled by British and Italian position papers that made their way into the public domain.